Jul 20

Cookbook 113: Breadmaking

This was definitely a second hand purchase, I know this because it has a dedication to Joan by Geavye (??) dated February 1984.  Breadmaking by Jill Graham is way out of print.  It’s a recipe book of bread, and really that’s all I want sometimes – a whole lot of bread, freshly made and so incredibly tasty.  It’s a good recipe book, full of different types of breads, including yeast-free, sweetened bread, flat breads, regular breads and breads with fruit in them.

The instructions are clear, the results are tasty, and I want to make more bread from this book.  With that, I give this book 4 out of 5 stars.

Onion Bread

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of baker’s flour or plain flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 15g compressed yeast or 1 1/2 teaspoons dried yeast
  • 3/4 cup lukewarm water
  • 1/2 lukewarm milk
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 2 medium-sized onions, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 teaspoon cumin or fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • additional 1/2 teaspoon salt

Method:

  1. Warm the flour and salt in a mixing bowl in the oven for a few minutes.  Dissolve the yeast with 1/4 cup of the water and set aside until frothy.  Blend the remaining water, milk and egg with 1/4 cup of the melted butter.
  2. Make a well in the centre of the flour, pour in the yeast and egg mixtures and mix to a soft dough.  Cover and leave in a warm, draught-free place until doubled in volume, about 1 hour.
  3. While the dough is rising, combine the remaining ingredients and set aside.
  4. Punch the dough down, turn onto a well-floured board.  Knead until the dough is smooth and no longer sticks to the board.  Roll and press to a 30 x 45cm rectangle.  Spread the onion mixture over the dough and cut lengthwise into three strips.  Roll each strip into a long tube enclosing the filling, pinch the wedges and ends together to seal.  Plait the strands together and carefully roll onto a lightly oiled baking tray.  Cover and leave for 45 – 50 minutes until doubled in volume.  Preheat the oven to 180C. Bake the bread for 35 minutes or until crisp and golden.

Notes on this recipe:

  • I made this ages ago, but didn’t write this book up. I remember everyone loved the bread and was very happy with it.
  • The plaiting is a bit annoying, but it generally is when you plait dough.

Cinnamon Plaits


Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup lukewarm milk
  • 1/4 cup melted butter
  • 1/4 cup castor sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 15g compressed yeast, or 1 1/2 teaspoons dried yeast
  • 2.75 – 3 cups baker’s flour or plain flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • cold milk for brushing
  • poppy seeds for sprinkling

Method:

  1. Stir the milk, butter, sugar and salt together until blended.  Add the yeast and pour the mixture into a warm mixing bowl; leave until foamy.  Add 1 cup of the lour, the cinnamon and the egg, beat together to form a thick paste.  Gradually add enough of the remaining flour to form a soft but non-sticky dough.  Knead, by machine and dough hook or by hand on a floured board, until the dough is smooth and slightly shiny (10 minutes).
  2. Place the dough in an oiled bowl, turn once to coat the surface and leave, covered, in a warm, draught-free place until doubled in size, approximately 1 hour.  Punch the dough down and divide into three equal parts.  Cover and rest for 5 minutes.
  3. Roll the dough into 30 cm ropes, join at one end by pinching together, and plait the ropes firmly on a lightly oiled baking tray.  Join the ends and tuck them under.  Cover and leave in a warm place until doubled in volume, 35 – 40 minutes.  Preheat the oven to 190C.  Brush the dough lightly with milk and sprinkle poppy seeds over.  Bake for 25 minutes, or until the crust sounds hollow when rapped.

Notes on this recipe:

  • This was delightfully tasty.  Not hugely sweet, but with enough cinnamon and a hint of sweetness that made it a perfect afternoon snack.  Highly recommended spread with a bit of butter.
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